Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low-value curved timber
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Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low-value curved timber

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Lumber -- Drying.,
  • Lumber -- Heat treatment.,
  • Wood -- Thermal properties.,
  • Lodgepole pine.,
  • Forest fires -- Prevention and control -- Economic aspects.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesMicrowave-drying and straightening technology for low-value curved timber.
StatementJohn R. Hunt ... [et al.; research funded by] National Fire Plan Research Program, USDA Forest Service.
SeriesResearch note FPL -- RN-0296., Research note FPL -- 0296.
ContributionsHunt, John R., Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.)
The Physical Object
Pagination4 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16128641M

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Additional Physical Format: Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low-value curved timber 4 p. (OCoLC) Material Type. Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low-value curved timber / John R. Hunt [et al.; research funded by] National Fire Plan Research Program, USDA Forest Service. Title: Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low-value curved timber Source: Research Note FPL-RN Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory. 4 p.   The power regulator worked based on the integral cycle control method, that is, power level is either % or 0% of rated values. The developmental work included development of microwave drying setup, design of a triac phase-controlled power regulator, and modification of original electrical circuit. Development of microwave drying setup.

Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low value curved timber. F. P. Laboratory, US Department of Agriculture Lampert H () Faserplatten. () Development. As such, this technology will be most beneficial for smaller-scale installations, and less so at production-scale. Microwave Drying: Microwave drying relies on additional energy being supplied that’s preferentially absorbed by the solvents in the process to enhance evaporation. Microwaves are a form of electromagnetic energy ( Mhz– Microwave drying turned out to be faster and facilitates even economical drying of thick boards. () Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low value curved timber. F. P. Laboratory, US Department of Agriculture. 5. drying and straightening technology for low value curved timber. F. Walsh, P. and Winandy, J. E. (): Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low value curved.

T. Durance, P. Yaghmaee, in Comprehensive Biotechnology (Second Edition), Conclusions. Microwave drying as sole source of energy or in combination with other drying methods has been shown in laboratory studies and industrial applications to be among the most rapid of dehydration methods. Furthermore, when microwave drying is combined with reduced air pressure such that . Forest Products Laboratory (U.S.): Development of new microwave-drying and straightening technology for low-value curved timber / (Madison, WI: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, []), also by John R. Hunt (page images at HathiTrust).   Microwave and Radio Frequency Drying 1. GBH Enterprises, Ltd. Process Engineering Guide: GBHE-PEG-DRY Microwave and Radio Frequency Drying Information contained in this publication or as otherwise supplied to Users is believed to be accurate and correct at time of going to press, and is given in good faith, but it is for the User to satisfy itself of the suitability of the information .   Drying is a widespread concept in the food industry, typically employed to convert a surplus crop into a shelf-stable commodity. With advancement of technology, however, there is interest in moving forward from the traditional convective air drying that is most widely used today for grains, both to improve product quality as well as to modernize processes in order to increase throughput and.